A Day of Rest and Monopoly, Of Course ~ A Journey to the Top of Aconcagua

Wednesday, 15 January 2014

Camp 1 – Rest Day

Hiking Time: 0 Hours

Altitude: 5000m

The gloriousness of antibiotics that knock you out for the whole night! I woke feeling semi-human again. It really is amazing what a good night’s sleep at 5000 metres can do.

The other good start to the morning was that we woke up to a winter wonderland! It had snowed quite a bit overnight and it was still snowing lightly and our tents were weighed down with the weight of the snow and upon peeking outside, this glorious white mountain wonderland greeted our sight. It was truly beautiful. And cold!

Soon, Adrian our guide, was knocking on our tent flap offering us hot water for a nice cup of tea. This rest day was really working for me already!

With the snow still falling outside, no one was getting up to venture out and so we spent the early morning snuggled up in our cozy down sleeping bags. One of our team mates came to visit and came inside for a while for a chat. It was lovely to have her company but all too soon she left again to return to her tent.  Minutes later she returned, crying. Emotions were running high this morning in camp, the reality of mountain life being felt by everyone. This was the 2nd team-mate to break down this morning and it wasn’t even 9am yet. Later I heard of a 3rd team-mate who got teary too. We all missed our loved one’s back home. The comforts of having encouraging words from those we love, maybe a hug, or maybe even just to hear them say hello. It’s hard to explain but the feelings hit you hard when they come and everyone feels them at some point or another while on these journeys. But we had an amazing team and in the absence of our loved ones we all offered a hug, support and a kind word in return. At the end of the day anyone can get into physical shape, but you have to be mentally tough to survive weeks in such harsh conditions. At high altitudes, your body lets you know what’s going on, and it is always important to listen.

Early morning view from our tent.

Early morning view from our tent.

White out!

White out!

It was still snowing outside and there was not a single change Judi and I were getting up. Today was a rest day after all!

It was still snowing outside and there was not a single change Judi and I were getting up. Today was a rest day after all!

A cold, snowy morning at Camp 1.

A cold, snowy morning at Camp 1.

Bruno filling up our flasks with hots water outside our tent in the falling snow, while we lay snug in our sleeping bags.

Bruno filling up our flasks with hot water outside our tent in the falling snow, while we lay snug in our sleeping bags.

Later, it was my turn to have those feelings hit hard. After the snow stopped and the sun came out we all ventured outside to breathe in the air at this new altitude and get our bodies acclimatised. Some of the team just sat in front of their tents, others sat on rocks enjoying the sunshine as they read or wrote in their journals. I too sat on a rock in the sunshine, writing in my journal. A while later a few of us standing leaning against a rock were chatting and Ronnie kindly offered his satellite phone to us to phone a loved one back home. Judi and Lisa snapped up the offer to phone their loved ones. Ronnie then handed me the phone asking if I wanted to phone someone back home. I desperately wanted to and instantly the tears stung my eyes and the lump in my throat rendered me speechless and all I could do was cry. I longed to phone a loved one back home but I had left my mobile phone at Base Camp along with the rest of my luggage I thought I didn’t need on our summit push. I didn’t know the mobile number as in today’s technology we don’t need to memorise numbers of loved one’s because we conveniently just select a name and push dial. I was devastated but there was nothing I could do. Simon came over and put his arm around my shoulder and squeezed which just instantly brought the tears again. He told me again what an amazing job I did yesterday. In those moments I was so grateful to have Judi and Simon, my Kilimanjaro team mates, with me again on this Aconcagua trip. The three of us have special bond from our time spent on Kilimanjaro. Although my loved ones were far away, half way across the world, I had these guys and although the feelings for so many of us today were so raw, it helped having beautiful souls around.

Thankfully the day got better and in all ways we all started feeling stronger. As the sun warmed the earth, the snow started melting again and like a solar panel, the sun’s rays began to re-energize me. My cough was still my constant companion and I still didn’t feel well but the antibiotics were already beginning to work their magic and I knew if I rested today I would begin to feel stronger again.

I thought long and hard to myself if I had really trained for all these months, carrying 15kg’s of weight up and down local peaks during the early morning hours, just to be taken down by a chest infection? I had prepared so hard for this climb and had taken every possible precaution, but here I was nursing an aching body, sore lungs and a head that still felt like it wanted to explode.  I could only hope for the best, to see how the antibiotics helped and how quickly my body could recover at this altitude. More than ever I was so grateful for the rest day we had today.

Life at Camp 1.

Life at Camp 1.

The frozen stream where we had to get our water from. Needless to say it was ice cold!

The frozen stream where we had to get our water from. Needless to say it was ice cold!

Judi braving the frozen stream to fill up our water bottles.

Judi braving the frozen stream to fill up our water bottles.

After lunch, the decision was unanimous, what better way to spend the afternoon than playing monopoly of course! Armed with Simon’s M & M’s 6 of us crammed into Simon and Daniel’s tent and we hauled out the cards. After a rough start to the morning, soon we were all laughing, scheming , wheeling and dealing in the tent high up on a mountain at 5000m.

Our snow boots off and crammed into the tent, it was time to play Monopoly.

Our snow boots off and cramed into the tent, it was time to play Monopoly.

Six team mates crammed into a tent, playing Monopoly. One of the best afternoons ever, thanks for the great memories guys!!

Six team mates crammed into a tent, playing Monopoly. One of the best afternoons ever, thanks for the great memories guys!!

Our itinerary from here on out has changed quite a bit. Tomorrow we should have done a load carry up to Camp 2 and then returned to sleep at Camp 1 again but due to severe weather coming in, we have decided to forgo our carry and acclimatisation hike to Camp 2 in order to move our summit day forward in an attempt to summit before the bad weather hits. The team is in agreement we want to move forward to have the highest success of summiting. It has also been agreed and arranged that some extra porters will be coming up tomorrow morning to help with the load carry up to Camp 2 in order to help us acclimatise a bit better. We have a steep start to our climb tomorrow, another path that zig-zags it’s way to the top but I’m told it’s not like the climb to Camp 1. I’m grateful for this news and I’m grateful for the porter help we will have tomorrow. I’m hoping for another good nights rest, which I am sure the antibiotics will help with.

Today’s rest has been good and exactly what my body needed.

I’m positive I will be feeling stronger tomorrow.

I’m ready for the next climb.

My purpose is my passion.

And I know what I have to do.

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~ All Photos By Me ~

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Scree, Scree and More Scree – A Journey to the Top of Aconcagua

Monday, 13 January 2014

Plaza Argentina (Base Camp) – Load Carry to Camp 1 – Plaza Argentina

Hiking Time: 7 – 8 hours round trip

Altitude: 4200m – 5000m – 4200m

I woke early in the morning after my worst night on the mountain, drifting in an out of sleep, coughing continuously and having difficulty breathing due to a head that felt like it wanted to explore. I woke up feeling absolutely shattered and completely fragile.

It was certainly not ideal for this to happen today. It was going to be a hard day, I just didn’t realise yet just how hard it was going to be. Today we were doing a load carry (20kg’s each) up to Camp 1. We would drop the items there and return to Base Camp again for the night.

Judi holding up what we weighed our bags on to ensure we didn't carry heavier than 20kg's.

Judi holding up what we weighed our bags on to ensure we didn’t carry heavier than 20kg’s.

Around the breakfast table Ronnie took our oxygen levels, as he did every morning, and he chatted to us about the weather. The weather wasn’t looking good for this afternoon but by the time it was due to hit we should be heading back down again. Ronnie was also checking the weather for the next few days. Reports were coming in of gale force winds and bad weather close to our summit day. It was the start of concern for our summit. The bad weather was looking like it was going to last a few days. Ronnie would check again later tonight to confirm the reports. If the bad weather was due to hit, it would affect our summit schedule.

The team at breakfast on Day 4, although I'm sure altitude was affecting us now as we had certainly been on the mountain longer than 4 day!

The team at breakfast on Day 4, although I’m sure altitude was affecting us now as we had certainly been on the mountain longer than 4 days!

Today my backpack felt freakishly heavy unlike yesterday when I had tested it. I knew it was because of how I was feeling. There are two reasons for the load carry method. Firstly, to half the load we are carrying each day reducing the strain on our bodies. The second is for acclimatisation. There is a well-established theory known as ‘climb high sleep low’ which supports the idea that one should climb to a higher elevation and then descend to a lower height to sleep. It gives our body a chance to experience a higher elevation for a short while and then returns to a more comfortable elevation.

After breakfast we hurried to get all our things together ready for our trek. The sun was out and it was already hot. Today we all wore our snow boots in order for us to get used to walking in them. It’s different to walk in snow boots, your foot is unable to bend and lifting your feet feels heavy because of the boot. We set out in single file, trudging along the trail as we made our way up. We had 800 metres to climb today. Not much at all at sea level but at altitude and the steep slope ahead of us, it was going to take approximately 7 to 8 hours to do a round trip.

Not quite ready for the climb due to how I was feeling, but smiling all the same!

Not quite ready for the climb due to how I was feeling, but ready for the challenge!

I walked with my surgical mask over my face, trying hard to stop myself breathing in the dust, which would only make my already persistent cough worse. With my nose blocked and weight on my back making me breathe harder, my chest was heaving heavily already as I tried desperately to get air into my lungs as my airways felt on fire. Everything was an effort.

The landscape was dry and barren. Boulders lay everywhere, like a scrapyard for forgotten things. I spent a large part of the walk to Camp 1 in silence. Every step was a conscious effort to keep moving forward. The rest step, still feeling unnatural, kept my pace steady giving my body time to catch its breath before I took another step forward. But I knew it was the wise thing to do if I was going to reach my destination. Instead of counting to three during the pause, I silently recited what drives me to climb these mountains: Cure. Cystic. Fibrosis. Step. Cure. Cystic. Fibrosis. This mantra gave me a constant reminder of my priorities, and in some small way, it felt like my best friend Emma, who had succumbed to this disease at the age of 22, was walking there with me, cheering me on.

Looking back, the views behind were simply beautiful.

Looking back, the views behind were simply beautiful.

The team having a break.

The team having a break.

A great picture of me captured by Judi. This picture captures so much of what I was feeling as we climbed to Camp 1 ~ pure exhaustion as I struggled with flu like symptoms as we climbed to 5000m.  *Photo By Judi Kurgan*

A great picture of me captured by Judi. This picture captures so much of what I was feeling as we climbed to Camp 1 ~ pure exhaustion as I struggled with flu-like symptoms as we climbed to 5000m. *Photo By Judi Kurgan*

The team stopped often to rest and at times waited for the whole group to get together due to dangerous parts of the trail that are well-known for rock falls. Our guides explained that it’s important for us to keep together in these areas.

Soon the path up turned to short zig-zags to help with the steepness of the trail we were climbing. There was plenty of rocks and scree now littering the pathway, making it so much more difficult as with each step my feet would start to slide back a few steps. My backpack felt heavy and was weighing me down. I coughed continuously, a dry irritating cough from the dust. Everything hurt.

Another team up ahead about to start on the zig-zagging path that helps with the steepness.

Another team up ahead about to start on the zig-zagging path to ease the steepness.

The team gathering together at a place where rockfalls were common. Here we had to walk with extra care.

The team gathering together at a place where rockfalls were common. Here we had to walk with extra care.

The team making the steep climb up to Camp 1.

The team making the steep climb up to Camp 1.

The pace was slow and as we neared the top things became incredibly frustrating. Walking on scree (loose sand and stones) now with each step our feet would slide back down again. It was feeling impossible to haul yourself up any higher with 20kg’s on your back without sliding right back down again. With each step all you wanted was for your foot to stay in place, but inevitably it slid back down again. I was tired. I was sore and with everything blocked up I was struggling to take in enough oxygen to power me up. All I wanted was to get to Camp 1.

Finally, after what seemed like hours, we took the last step on the scree and were finally standing on the top leading to Camp 1. I couldn’t have been happier. A short walk over to Camp 1, we found Bruno and Adrian, two of our guides who had gone ahead, had already put up two tents for us to drop our luggage and food.

A sign that brought tears to my eyes. We had finally made it!

A sign that brought tears to my eyes. We had finally made it!

Peculiar 'spikey' snow that has been formed by the wind greeted us as we walked into Camp 1.

 ‘Spikey’ snow that has been formed by the wind greeted us as we walked into Camp 1.

The team walking into Camp 1.

The team walking into Camp 1.

Angel and Bruno, two of our guides, relaxing at Camp 1.

Angel and Bruno, two of our guides, relaxing at Camp 1.

The team enjoying some time-out at Camp 1 before heading back down.

The team enjoying some time-out at Camp 1 before heading back down.

The weather was already turning, a cold wind was blowing and the sky above us was turning dark as the thunderous clouds rolled in. It felt good to sit down without the heavy load on my back. I didn’t feel particularly hungry but forced myself to eat what I could to refuel my body as I knew now, more than ever, it needed that extra boost. After a good rest we were once gain putting on our backpacks, only this time they were empty, to head back down to Base Camp.

An empty Camp 1.

An empty looking Camp 1, Aconcagua.

Views from Camp 1.

Views from Camp 1, Aconcagua.

Completely untouched photo, the views from Camp 1 were just jaw-dropping!

Completely untouched photo, the views from Camp 1 were just jaw-dropping!

The journey down to Base Camp was so much quicker and so much easier. We ski’d down all the scree parts with swift easy movements helping us gain ground quickly and effortlessly as the stormy weather rolled in above us. We passed a few people going up and I found myself so grateful we were on our way down.

Heading back down to Base Camp, which can be seen in the far distance at the bottom.

Heading back down to Base Camp from Camp 1, which can be seen in the far distance at the bottom.

Once back down in Base Camp all I wanted to do was sleep but before I headed to my tent to do just that, I booked my slot for a nice hot shower later this afternoon, which was to become one of my highlights of the day. After a good nap, Angel prepared the hot water in the two showers for Judi and myself. It was rather glorious to be able to wash my hair, scrub the dust off my body and to feel clean and fresh again. It’s just a pity thought I didn’t have much in the way of wardrobe options!

Angel getting our hot water ready for a nice hot shower.

Angel getting our hot water ready for a nice hot shower.

Hot shower anyone? This is how the water is boiled to enable us to have a hot shower. Life on a mountain really is simple!

Hot shower anyone? This is how the water is boiled to enable us to have a hot shower. Life on a mountain really is simple!

Around the dinner table tonight, Ronnie confirmed bad weather was heading for us and that we may have to adjust our planned summit day to get in before the bad weather hits. He would keep monitoring the weather and keep us posted. As usual around the dinner table we went around the table listening to each team member’s highlights and lowlights of the day. As my turn came around, the emotions unexpectedly welled up inside of me. It had been a very emotional day for me behind my reflective sunglasses as I walked in silence. My lowlight was how sick I was feeling but my highlight was part of two things, of course my hot shower but more so it was the realisation that continued to sweep over me as if it were waves crashing over me at the ocean. As I climbed, my body taking extra strain because of how sick I was feeling, and as my lungs gasped for air, it reminded me why I was doing this climb. It reminded me of what my friend Emma had to endure on the really bad days of having Cystic Fibrosis. It gave me a glimpse of what so many living with this disease have to endure every single day of their lives. In those moments, as hard as it was for me to catch my breath and to simply breathe it was such a blessing reminding me of the purpose of my climb. For us on a normal day it is easy to simply take in a lung full of air but for those living with Cystic Fibrosis, they fight on a daily basis for the most basis thing; to breathe!

Hard doesn’t even begin to explain what today was for me.

I am grateful for the challenge.

I am grateful for the reminders.

For I am drawing on my purpose that fuels my passion.

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 ~ All Photos By Me, Except for the One of Me, Thanks Judi Kurgan! ~

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